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Q&A -Keeping IMT 580 ALIVE

by on February 26, 2010

Hi friends!!

We are almost at the end of this quarter and have been reading blogs and posts since last 2 months.Though I haven’t initiated  significant discussions here but I have an idea now.Yes, an idea for keeping this forum alive even after IMT 580 class.

I feel that most of the students have observed the absence of long lasting healthy discussion  here (even on a very good topic).So lets try another approach.Instead of students coming up with interesting articles, we all can post questions here and class mates  will try to answer the questions in best possible way.We can use organizational cases,online articles ,journals and other sources to support our answers.Please tell me how do you like this idea,because we can surely promote this by giving awards like ‘best answer’, ‘innovative thinking’ and other incentives which I am still figuring out.

As an example,I will start the discussion by the following question???

How do you stay encouraged and motivated after getting a 360 degree feedback?

-Ashish Malviya


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4 Comments
  1. Hi Professor Kevin,

    Can we try out this idea more formally in the interest of maximum participation.I have some ideas which I am writing below:
    1) There should be a separate column on the site for questions arranged in category.
    2) We would like to invite you to visit the column to read the answers and judge the ‘best answer’, ‘innovative thinking’ etc from the student replies.
    3) In condition of this task being an additional work for you. We can have one evaluator from class who will judge the answers primarily for you. Evaluator will be decided by the number of ‘best answers’ he has given in a month.
    This is just a start, more ideas are invited…..

    Ashish Malviya

  2. Mansi Sharma permalink

    I think this is an excellent idea!

    Well, about the question that you raised, I feel that 360 degree feedback is a very good method of knowing about one’s performance in an organization in totality. In contrast to conventional feedback system, 360 degree feedback system helps one to know what exactly their manager, peers and subordinates think about their work in the team. This helps one to grow and maintain good relationships with not just their peers but also with their manager and subordinates. I feel in an organization, it often happens that people excel only in one direction. 360′ degree feedback helps an individual to develop in multifaceted fashion. Such a feedback is encouraged and respected because it helps one to grow and contribute in every role that he or she is assigned.

    Overall, such feedback keeps an employee motivated as their strengths are regularly appreciated. This way one would come to know, about what they should continue to do. Also, it will be easy to keep track of action items of what one should discontinue and improve upon. Such a constant loop of feedback will improve an employee’s contribution, keep them motivated and hence increase their impact on the team.

  3. Jeroen permalink

    I also believe this is a good idea, but implementation will decide if it fails or not. Many things need to work well for it to succeed. Amongst them the most important – that people are interested.

    —-

    About the 360 Degree Feedback
    A lot can be learned from the “Discussion” pages on Wikipedia. Here are some excerpts from it that are actually negative:

    “Okay: it sucks. Take it from a long-time IBMer. It started in about the mid-1980s and began to die about 2000 because of its ineffectiveness and morale-lowering difficulty. It creates a lot of paperwork and doesn’t yield much insight that the employee can’t get from his manager. Peers rate each other too generously and subordinates are afraid to criticize their superiors. Plus, how many people do you need to tell you that you should be more proactive in managing risk and look for ways to expand your skill set? However, in a modified form (such as infrequent subordinate evaluations of their managers), it may remain useful”

    1999 Watson Wyatt Human Capital Index: http://www.watsonwyatt.com/research/featured/hci.asp – “potentially draining shareholder value by as much as 14.5 to 33.9% for practices such as developmental training for career advancement, 360-degree feedback programs and using HR technology for softer goals such as improved culture and/or communication.”

  4. Jeroen permalink

    I also believe this is a good idea, but implementation will decide if it fails or not. Many things need to work well for it to succeed. Amongst them the most important – that people are interested.

    —-

    About the 360 Degree Feedback
    A lot can be learned from the “Discussion” pages on Wikipedia. Here are some excerpts from it that are actually negative:

    Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/360-degree_feedback

    “Okay: it sucks. Take it from a long-time IBMer. It started in about the mid-1980s and began to die about 2000 because of its ineffectiveness and morale-lowering difficulty. It creates a lot of paperwork and doesn’t yield much insight that the employee can’t get from his manager. Peers rate each other too generously and subordinates are afraid to criticize their superiors. Plus, how many people do you need to tell you that you should be more proactive in managing risk and look for ways to expand your skill set? However, in a modified form (such as infrequent subordinate evaluations of their managers), it may remain useful”

    1999 Watson Wyatt Human Capital Index: http://www.watsonwyatt.com/research/featured/hci.asp – “potentially draining shareholder value by as much as 14.5 to 33.9% for practices such as developmental training for career advancement, 360-degree feedback programs and using HR technology for softer goals such as improved culture and/or communication.”

    My self I have realized that feedback of any kind depends on the person. I have been in situations where an individual gets very harsh feedback and still manages to remain calm and take it seriously. Other times I have given feedback to someone, I was not harsh or demeaning, but they get to the brink of crying. My lesson: It all depends on how well a person can detach themselves from the feedback and not take it as something personal.

    Jeroen van den Eijkhof

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